Lennart Anderson

Lennart Anderson (1927-2015)

One of America’s preeminent representational painters, Lennart Anderson lost his central vision in 2003. Since then, he has adapted his approach to painting in numerous ways in order to continue working. More information on Anderson’s recent work and artistic practices can be found at Painting Perceptions (paintingperceptions.com) and in the 2014 film, Lennart Anderson: Seeing with Light, produced by The American Macular Degeneration Foundation, and available on this website under Archives/Lennart Anderson: Seeing with Light.

Salami on red plastic dish with potato (2001)

Salami on red plastic dish with potato (2001)
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Salami on red plastic dish with potato (2001)

Still Life with Mannequin and Red Cloth (1998)

Still Life with Mannequin and Red Cloth (1998)
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Still Life with Mannequin and Red Cloth (1998)

Morris Dorsky 1990-91

Morris Dorsky 1990-91
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Morris Dorsky 1990-91

Edwin Vasquez (1991)

Edwin Vasquez (1991)
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Edwin Vasquez (1991)

Comments

My father, David Levine, was also a painter -- and friend and admirer of Lennart's work. Like Lennart, my father lost central vision to macular degeneration. One day, I was with my father at his retinal specialist to learn more about the then-new treatment for AMD using intraocular injections of an anti-VEGF compound. To our surprise, Lennart was there, too. My father and Lennart compared notes about the impact that vision loss had had on them as artists. My father had lost his career as a caricaturist to AMD, but he continued to paint, although not as avidly as Lennart, who described working so closely to his canvas that if he dropped a brush he might not find it for some time. My father said that he would sit in front of unfinished work and take it in different directions in his mind. From their conversation it was clear that they still perceived life as artists and had undiminished ambitions to create, because that was what they were and how they lived. I could feel a tingle of inspiration -- and sensed that my father had it, too -- when Lennart said he was off to see some art galleries. He walked slowly and carefully toward the elevators. “Do you want us to walk with you?” I called after him. “I’m fine,” he said. “I’m fine.”

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